Search Results for: Sandstone

Conference Report – Symposium on the Old Red Sandstone, Brecon, October 2014

November 14, 20141:18 pmNovember 12, 2015 4:30 pm

At the start of October Elliot and Kate presented at the inaugural Symposium on the Old Red Sandstone in Brecon. The Old Red Sandstone is the name given to the rocks formed between about 420 and 360 million years ago when Britain was at the margins of an arid desert. Its predominantly red rocks – […]

A (Very) Short History of the Bromsgrove Sandstone

August 18, 20141:51 pmNovember 11, 2015 3:43 pm

Here at Building Stones HQ we are busily putting together an exhibition to coincide with our upcoming roadshow at Avoncroft Museum 26th-28th August. Here’s sneak peak of some of the research going into that, much of which draws upon the Reverend Alan White’s excellent historical paper on the Bromsgrove quarrying and brickmaking industry. The Bromsgrove Sandstone […]

Hollybush Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:00 am

Cambrian age, dark green, flaggy, micaceous sandstone with abundant chlorite and glauconite. Only known use for building is in Hollybush Church. Browse sites on the database using Hollybush Sandstone

Downton Castle Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:00 am

Thinly bedded yellow-brown or buff micaceous fine-grained sandstone with interbedded brown-grey siltstone and mudstone. The narrow bedding make the sandstone bands an excellent tilestone and, where the beds are thickest, freestone. In the Mortimer Forest and other areas west of Ludlow, the Downton Castle Sandstone was an important dimension stone for lintels or more important […]

Grinshill Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:00 am

Grey sandstone from the Triassic Helsby Sandstone Formation of North Shropshire. It is used sparsely in Herefordshire and Worcestershire from the 19th Century onwards, generally for dressings or additions to existing buildings. Easily recognised by the presence of pressure dissolution veins which appears as paler grey, slightly protruding veins, cross-cutting the rock surface. Examples include […]

Arden Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:00 am

Fine- to medium-grained, variably coloured green, brown, buff and mauve sandstones with some beds of conglomerate which occur locally. Often cross-bedded with planar or trough-shaped laminations. Used locally along its outcrop which forms a rough E-W belt from Malvern Hills in west to Inkberrow in east. Local varieties include grey Inberrow Sandstone and grey to […]

Triassic Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:01 am

The majority of the Triassic Sandstones found in Worcestershire are from the fluvially deposited Sherwood Sandstone Group (named after its type outcrop in Nottinghamshire) which outcrops across the centre and north of the county. The group consists of red, brown and grey sandstones, commonly pebbly or conglomeratic at the bases of beds, interbedded with red […]

Bridgnorth Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:07 am

The Bridgnorth Sandstone Formation is a soft, brick red, commonly buff-mottled, Permian sandstone characterised by large dune cross-beds. Formed from wind-blown (aeolian) sand and relatively poorly cemented, it is not widely used in comparison to the Carboniferous and Triassic red sandstones of the county. The most notably example of its use is in Wribbenhall Railway […]

Pennant Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:07 am

Pennant sandstone has been widely used in the 20th and 21st Centuries for paving, replacement/restoration and new build. It is a Carboniferous age Coal Measures sandstone, very well cemented and medium to coarse grained. In colour it varies from blue-grey to buff or greenish. Liesegang iron staining is often seen. Its most distinguishing feature is […]

Old Red Sandstone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:07 am

The Old Red Sandstone is a large group of rocks of late Silurian and Devonian age. They were formed in a semi-arid desert environment which has given them their conspicuous red colouring through the intense weathering of iron-bearing minerals. Nevertheless, they are highly variable in outcrop with red, green, purple or brown colourings, coexisting in […]