Project Update – Winter 2014

December 17, 20144:04 pmNovember 11, 2015 4:34 pm

Dry stone walling at Huntingdon Church, HerefordshireWe had a busy summer with shows and stands including Hereford County Fair, Beckford Open Gardens and Bromyard Big Picnic. We chatted to lots of lovely people including may stone house owners who are letting us do descriptions and even have samples of their wonderful homes. Thank you to all of the volunteers who helped us prepare for and run these events. It really does help and we couldn’t do it without you.

Throughout Autumn was our series of volunteer training days. Especially popular was our trip to Hadley Quarry, kindly run by owners Rob and Heather Barningham, who shared their knowledge and experience of researching quarry history with our volunteers over a cup of tea and cake in their garden.

We also ran a drystone wall training course at Huntington Church, near Kington. Four keen volunteers, under the watchful eye of tutor Tim Flemming took down a section of the churchyard wall and rebuilt it. The church is very pleased with the work and has a display of photos up in the vestibule.

Cold and wet winter days offer the perfect chance to stay warm and dry and visit libraries, museums and archives to read up about your chosen building and discover hidden facts that may help lead you to details of the source of the stone and could take you anywhere. The current mission of the Building Stone Office is to track down some of the stone used in the repair of Worcester Bridge. After a hint from volunteer Catriona, stone from Derbyshire is looking promising so we will be trying our luck at the Records Office over the Christmas holidays.Large picked face in Hadley Quarry

To assist everyone with their research, providing links, tip and general information we have produced and brought together a series of volunteer guides on a huge number of subjects including using archives, libraries and newspapers. All of the guides are available to download from here and a full list of the guides is available. If you would like to have paper copies of any of these guides then please do let me know which ones you are interested in ([email protected] or 01905 542014) and we will post them to you.

As always we are grateful to all our volunteers for the time and effort that they have given to help us discover more about our stone built heritage. At the moment we have had a huge 3617 hours worth £42368. This is about 44.8% of the total we need for the project, so a little behind where we would like to be at this point. If you haven’t sent yours in yet, please do.

 

This article originally appeared in the A Thousand Years of Building with Stone volunteer newsletter, Winter 2014.

Written by Elliot Carter

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