Gorsley Stone

January 1, 201312:00 pmMay 26, 2016 9:00 am

Local variety of Downton Castle Sandstone quarried from Linton Quarry and other smaller working in Gorsley, SE Herefordshire. The historic buildings of Gorsley village are almost all built from this stone. In comparison to varieties elsewhere in the county the Gorsley Stone has less of a greenish tinge and is marked by an attractive pale grey colour, superimposed upon by orange liesegang rings and staining which together give a honey-coloured appearance. This colouring may be due to a shallower depth of burial than parts of the basin (e.g. near Ludlow) where sediment accumulation was much greater. Deeper burial might have induced mild metamorphism characterised by the growth of the green mineral chlorite. In contrast at Gorsley subsidence appears to have been very limited as indicated by the thinning of Silurian strata into a mid-series unconformity in the Linton Quarry.

Written by Elliot Carter

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