Bromyard & Downs

Red Sandstone Chapel, Bromyard DownsThe town of Bromyard lies on the main road between Worcester and Leominster, in eastern Herefordshire. The high land on which the town sits is called the Bromyard Plateau. It is underlain by hard sandstones and mudstones, formed from the erosion of ancient mountains during the Devonian Period.

There is huge variation in the building stones used in the town, ranging from rough cornstone conglomerates – possibly dug from cellars onsite – to fine green sandstones quarried on the Downs and coarse hard wearing grits brought from Bringsty Common, 5 miles away.

Untangling this history is an ongoing challenge.

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